Oklahoma Sooners

2005 Stats

Straight up

8-4 overall, 6-2 conference, 3rd Big 12 South

Against the spread

6-6 (2-4 home, 4-2 away, 3-6 grass)


7-5 (4-2 home, 3-3 away, 6-3 grass)

Offensive Rank


Defensive Rank


Turnover Margin

-.08 per game

2005 Season Summary

The Oklahoma Sooners, since 2001, had posted straight up records of 11-2, 12-2, 12-2, and 12-1 respectively under head coach Bob Stoops but the last two of those seasons ended in disappointment as OU lost the national championship game to end both 2003 and 2004. The 19-55 loss to USC to end the 2004 season was particularly troubling, especially since 13 starters would have to depart afterwards.

Reloading or rebuilding?

With the loss of so many great players the question about Oklahoma entering 2005 was whether they would be reloading or rebuilding? It was figured that under stoops, the former would be the case as over that phenomenal four-year cycle of dominance from 2001-2004 the coach had to replace other key personnel, though others would argue not to the degree that he had to now.

Straight up success was not translated

Although Oklahoma was a perennial national championship contender, their straight up success was not translated into big success against the sportsbooks. In fact, OU posted only ONE season in the black during that 2001-2004 run. The Sooners were the epitome of a “name brand” team that attracted a lot of ignorant money from the masses of asses who prefer betting NFL games, but also take college action on the most notorious powerhouse programs. Oklahoma’s lack of value was accentuated in 2004 when they went 12-1 straight up but just 4-9 against the spread as they and their backers bled red ink due to constant overlays.

The opener was a portent of things to come

Oklahoma hosted TCU in the 2005 season opener and despite having multitudes of new starters in the lineup they were still 25-point chalks against a Horned Frog team that failed to bowl in the season before. TCU pulled off a shocking 17-10 major upset win, however, as the opener was a portent of things to come. In their next game at home versus Tulsa, another non-BCS team that failed to bowl in 2004, OU was a 31-point chalk and failed to payoff in a 31-15 win. At resurgent UCLA the following game as a 6.5-point road dog, OU was beaten 24-41 to start off the year at 1-2 straight up and 0-3 against the spread.

Lost season meant increased value

At Oklahoma under Stoops, the program contended for national titles but that would not be the case in 2005 with those two early losses. The lost season meant increased value against the sportsbooks, however, as the masses of asses soured on the Sooners. In their next game at home versus Kansas State as 8.5-point chalks, OU proved they were still a solid program with a 43-21 statement maker.

Also ran status was confirmed

OU had owned the “Red River Shootout” against Texas over the years but was now a 14.5-point dog, losing 12-45 as their also ran status was confirmed.

Up and down

At Kansas the following week as a 7-point chalk, the Sooners prevailed 19-3. OU next hosted improving Baylor as a 14-point chalk, scoring a 37-30 win but failing yet again to payoff as a home chalk, falling to 1-3 against the number in that role. The up and down pattern continued at Nebraska where the Sooners were 2-point chalks in a 31-24 win and cover. In their next game at home versus struggling Texas A&M, OU was a 13-point chalk and again failed to get the cash in a 36-30 win as OU had proven once again to be an overlay at home.

Strong finish sparked optimism for 2006

Oklahoma next traveled to upstart Texas Tech where they were in the unusual role of 7-point dogs, losing at the gun on a highly controversial Tech TD 21-23. In the “Bedlam” game on Senior Day against Oklahoma State, the Sooners proved to finally NOT be a home overlay in a 42-14 win as 17.5-point chalks. This left the Holiday Bowl against Oregon, who was disappointed at not getting a BCS bid. OU was thrilled to be in the game, and it showed, as they beat the Ducks 17-14 as 3-point dogs for their third straight cover. The strong finish sparked optimism for 2006.