San Francisco Giants Baseball Betting history

The San Francisco Giants were born as the New York Giants in 1885 before being convinced to join the Brooklyn (Los Angeles) Dodgers in a move to the west coast for the start of the 1958 baseball betting season

The Giants defeated L.A. 8-0 in the first ever game between the transplanted teams at San Francisco‘s Seals Stadium. The team moved to Candlestick Park to start the 1960 baseball betting campaign, which was built on a location that was freezing cold at night, even in the summer. This would plague the Giants for decades both at the gate and on the field.

In 1962 baseball betting season the Giants rallied to tie the Dodgers after trailing them by 4 games with 7 remaining, forcing a best of three baseball gambling playoff series that the Giants won. That gave them a berth in the World Series against the Yankees. New York won a seven game heartbreaker.

While a solid club year after year with stars such as pitcher Juan Marichal, and sluggers Willie Mays and Willie McCovey, the Giants would not return to the baseball betting post season until 1971 when they won the NL West, before losing in the NLCS to Pittsburgh. Mays departed after the baseball betting season but a new player named Bobby Bonds would pick up the slack.

The 1970’s baseball betting season were a dismal decade for the Giants and the team was frequently rumored to be searching for a new home due to low attendance and sub-par play. 1982 saw the Giants contend until the final weekend but they went back to their losing ways the following baseball gambling year, and lost 100 games in 1985 baseball betting season.

Manager Roger Craig and GM Al Rosen started a new era in 1986 baseball betting season, however, with youngsters such as Will Clark and pitcher Mike Krukow. The Giants would win the NL West in 1987 baseball gambling season and NL pennant in 1989 with NL MVP Kevin Mitchell, before losing to Bay rival Oakland in the earthquake ravaged World Series in 4 baseball gambling games. By 1992 baseball betting season, however, the team was sold to Peter Magowan to avoid a move to Tampa. Barry Bonds, son of Bobby, signed for the 1993 baseball betting season.

Bonds’ first year produced 103 wins, but a second place finish to Atlanta. Bonds would “juice up” to hit tainted record 73 home runs in 2001 baseball betting season and win his first of back-to-back MVP awards. The Giants made post season in 1997, 2000, 2002, and 2003 but made the baseball betting World Series only in 2002, losing to Anaheim. A book about Bonds’ steroid use came out in the spring of 2006, casting clouds over the franchise.