Red Sox Sign Papelbon to One-Year Deal Baseball Bet

Baseball bet stats had the Boston Red Sox coming to terms with closer Jonathan Papelbon on a one-year deal worth $9.35 million dollars.

Papelbon has been a big part of Boston’s baseball betting success in recent seasons and he will return for the 2010 season.

Baseball bet had the Red Sox and Papelbon avoiding arbitration for the second straight season.  The deal between Boston and Papelbon is a huge one considering it is the largest ever for a relief pitcher that has been in the league four years or less.  Baseball betting indicated that there are a total of seven closers in the league who have contracts at $10 million or more and now Papelbon is right there as well.

Papelbon has had 35 or more saves in a baseball bet year three times and he has had a great strikeout to walk ratio and a very good ERA.  Last season, Papelbon saved 38 baseball bet games last season and only blew three saves.  Baseball betting stats showed that he was not as good in the playoffs but in his career he has been a very good closer. "My whole thing is consistency,'' Papelbon said, "I'm not one of these guys with a sub-2 ERA one year and a high-3 the next. My whole thing in all of this is the environment you pitch in. Wouldn't you want a guy to pitch in Boston, New York and Philadelphia who you know has consistently had just three or four blown saves a year. That's a rarity in itself." Baseball bet stats were not quite as good for Papelbon last season.  He did have a lot more walks (24) than usual as baseball bet number showed and his strikeout-to-walk ratio was a career-worst 3.17.  His WHIP went up to a career-worst 1.47.

Baseball bet stats indicated that Papelbon will be a free agent after the 2011 season so the Red Sox may look at another one-year deal after this baseball betting season.  Papelbon has said he is not opposed to signing a long-term deal. "At the same time, I'm not afraid to show that, hey, I want to be with the Red Sox [in a multiyear deal]. I'd love to have that sense of security of being with a team and knowing, 'Hey, they want me, and I want them, let's have a happy marriage.'”

Boston always works out contracts with their players so they don’t have to go to arbitration. In fact, since Theo Epstein became general manager they have never had an arbitration hearing.