Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Baseball Gambling history

Baseball odds fans know that the very name that they now use is an outstanding example of how the Angels have been in a constant struggle for their own identity.

Since their inaugural baseball gambling campaign of 1961 the Angels have been known as the Los Angeles Angles, California Angels, Anaheim Angels, and now the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Beyond that, they have had a multitude of different logos, caps, uniforms, and color schemes. Meanwhile on the other side of this metropolitan area, the Dodgers have the same basic look, logo, colors and stadium that they have had since the Angels were born.

After playing in minor league Wrigley Field in 1961 the Angels shared Dodger Stadium with their more notorious hosts from 1962-64, using the name “Chavez Ravine” for the ballpark during their baseball gambling games. Incredibly enough in their second baseball gambling season the Angels contended with the Yankees for the pennant before fading into third place with a respectable 86-76 baseball odds record!

They came back down to earth in the following baseball gambling seasons and then moved into their own beautiful state of the art home ballpark in 1966 baseball gambling season. The Angels struggled the baseball odds and on the field with their identity through the mid 1970’s baseball gambling seasons but pitcher Nolan Ryan was an attraction that they could take pride in. Ryan pitched 2-no hitters in 1973 en route to a 21-win baseball gambling season.

In 1978 baseball odds season Jim Fregosi took over as manager and the Angels began to win, taking the AL West title the following baseball gambling season before losing to Baltimore in the ALCS. Led by free agent acquisition Reggie Jackson, they would return to the post season in 1982 but lose to Milwaukee in the ALCS. In 1986 the Angels again won their baseball gambling division and were one out away from closing out Boston in the ALCS to advance to the World Series but the Red Sox Dave Henderson homered off Donnie Moore to bail the Red Sox out, who later clinched the ALCS back in Boston to shatter Angel hearts. Manager Gene Mach would manage just one more season for the Angels and Moore would kill himself in 1989. The Angels would not see the post season again until 2002.

With new bright red colors to go with their “Anaheim” identity the Angels took the wild card spot and upset the vaunted Yankees in the ALDS, followed wins against the Twins in the ALCS and Giants in the Fall Classic. In 2004 baseball gambling season they would return to the ALDS, losing to Boston.